Will the 21st Century Have the First Person to Live Longer Than 130 Years?

Most of us feel and think younger than we are or look.

The current pandemic kills older adults more rapidly than any other demographic. There are many reasons – multiple health problems being at the top of the list. The lifespan of Americans rose to 78.8 in 2019, up slightly from the year before. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/nchs_press_releases/2020/202012.htm

The United Kingdom has a higher lifespan – 81.26 years and India has a lower lifespan – 69.42. So it will be interesting to see what falls out after the pandemic – will we get a nudge forward or reverse?

21st Century Longevity

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210701150951.htm. More people are living past 100 years of age – around 500,000 in the world today. According to those keeping records, the oldest living person was Jeanne Calment of France – 122 years of age when she passed away in 1997. Today, Kane Tanaka (of Japan) is 118 years old.

What good does it do us if we live to 110 years of age and must have someone take care of us – change our diapers, feed us, bathe us, etc.? We want to be in good health right up to the end. The things that the current crop of 100+year-olds is doing is recorded in the International Database on Longevity (IDL), https://www.supercentenarians.org/.

Researchers are analyzing data and trends and are predicting that someone in 2021 will live between 125 and 132 years of age. Advances in health care have the potential to add a few years to the 100+year-old crowd, but not enough to sway the tables to bump a lot of people into the 120+year-old category.

One interesting comment I noted is that once people reach 110 years of age, the death rate is the same. That appears to be a limiting factor. It is not a disease that makes them succumb, but other factors – they have already outlived the effect of disease on their bodies.

Statistically, the world record of 122 years and 164 days will be broken in the next 80 years (100%). Living longer than 127 years is currently assessed at 68%. There is only a 13% chance of a person living today living past 130 years of age. The odds are at zero percent for a person living today to reach 135 years of age.

Curious About Your Country?

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.LE00.IN?end=2019&start=1960. This link will give you the latest update on longevity for almost any country in the world.

Tips for Living Longer

https://www.livescience.com/17314-tips-live-longer-longevity.html. Reducing calories and healthy relationships are two of a half-dozen suggested tips to liver longer.

Live Longer & Enjoy Life! – Red O’Laughlin – RedOLaughlin.com

 


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