New Test connects Dementia to Parkinson’s Disease

Eye tests show predictive abilities for dementia in Parkinson’s patients.

Approximately 50% of Parkinson’s patients develop dementia within ten years. Vision testing can predict the greater dementia likelihood in those with Parkinson’s disease (PD) up to 18 months in advance. Two studies confirm that vision degradation usually precedes the onset of dementia in people with PD. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210119102837.htm

First Study

https://bit.ly/3jays9e Movement Disorders journal article published January 9, 2021, Visual Dysfunction Predicts Cognitive Impairment, and White Matter Degeneration in Parkinson’s Disease describes standard visions tests performed on 77 Parkinson’s patients predicted the increased risk of dementia.

Using MRI scans, scientists discovered anomalies in the brain’s white matter related to vision and memory. The ‘wiring’ of the brain’s connections between the front and the back showed damaged areas. Patients with these pathway losses went on to develop dementia.

Second Study

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32190418/ and https://cp.neurology.org/content/10/1/29 and https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-9163093/Eyesight-tests-predict-people-Parkinsons-develop-dementia-18-months-on.html This study was published in the journal Communications Biology. Scientists scanned the brains of 88 people with Parkinson’s disease and 30 healthy adults using MRI. The differences in the scans showed distinct decoupling in areas of higher-order processing and abstract reasoning. Thirty-three of the Parkinson’s patients had visual issues.

Patients with visual problems had more separation areas between different regions of the brain, especially in the memory-related areas of the temporal lobe.

Conclusion

The regions of the brain that are disconnected provide targets for scientists to develop new treatments. The brain’s separate areas showed significant changes in the production of acetylcholine, serotonin, and noradrenaline. Drugs might restore healthy levels of neurotransmitters.

Live Longer & Enjoy Life! – Red O’Laughlin – RedOLaughlin.com


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.